The Ultimate Food Allergy Cookbook and Survival Guide

Allergy Cooking with Ease

Easy Bread Making for Special Diets

Easy Cooking for Special Diets

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I Love Dessert
but NOT Sugar, Wheat, Milk,
Gluten, Corn, Soy, Unhealthy Fat...

Table of Contents

Foreword............................................................................................ 6
I Love Dessert..................................................................................... 7
Simple Pleasures, Special Bonds........................................................... 9
Desserts Designed for Special Diets...................................................... 11
Make It Easy: Tricks and Tools of the Dessert Trade............................ 13
Know Your Ingredients........................................................................ 19
Recipes  

..........Simple Fruit Desserts..................................................................

34

..........Puddings....................................................................................

39

..........Cobblers, Crisps, Crumbles and Other Fruit Desserts.................

45

..........Pies............................................................................................

62

..........Cakes and Frostings...................................................................

74

..........Ice Cream, Sherbet and Sorbet..................................................

97

..........Dessert Waffles, Pancakes and Cones........................................

114

..........Sweet Breads, Coffee Cakes, Buns and Doughnuts.....................

120

..........Cookies.....................................................................................

153

..........Sauces and Toppings..................................................................

189

..........Confections, Snacks and Miscellaneous Recipes.........................

197

..........Especially for Guests..................................................................

205
(To see a complete list of the recipes in this book, click here).  
References  

..........Sources of Special Ingredients and Products...............................

228

..........Table of Measurements..............................................................

235

..........About Sweeteners, Health and Life.............................................

236

..........About Spelt................................................................................

241

..........References: Helpful Books and Websites....................................

243

..........Index to Recipes by Grain Use...................................................

245

..........General Index.............................................................................

250


Foreword

“Dessert” is not a bad word – at least it doesn’t need to be. However, somehow we have taken the custom of ending a meal on a sweet note and, like a snowball rolling down hill, expanded it in so many ways the end result borders on the obscene – with way too many calories, too much fat (and often the wrong kinds of fat, too), overly sweetened, and very often the serving is over-sized as well. On the other hand, Nickie Dumke, in this book, has used fresh fruits and whole grains to create delicious, health enhancing desserts. They are pleasantly sweetened, but not outrageously so. You’re on your own to keep the portion size under control!

Favorite desserts at our house include “Blueberry Cobbler,” (for a recipe, see page 54), any fruit crisp (recipes are on pages 45 to 46), and fresh fruits eaten out of hand like in-season tree-ripened peaches, black cherries or Rainier cherries, any and all berries, or grapes. And clearly it matters more to your total health what you eat day in, day out, much more than if you have an occasional splurge for a special occasion.

If our family has a tradition regarding desserts while traveling it is to say, “No, thank you.” Yet several years ago when we were on a three-generation family vacation with our daughter and two granddaughters who were in their early teens, we consented to a dessert splurge. We ordered a gigantic ice cream sundae, called a “volcano,” with about ten scoops of three flavors of ice cream, three or four sauces (which were the “lava”), some nuts, and a few wafers stuck into the edges. Oh, and of course, it was topped with a mountain of whipped cream. To get the picture, let me explain that this ONE monster dessert was served with five spoons! When everyone was totally satisfied, enough of the sundae for a few more servings remained. We all remember this event because it was unusual for us and great fun for all. I don’t think anyone’s health suffered as a result of the splurge. We don’t live like that normally and we haven’t repeated it in the seven years since. We have only pleasant memories – and not one bit of guilt.

Many family traditions and memories revolve around food – birthday cakes, wedding cakes, Thanksgiving feasts, Christmas and Easter dinners, anniversaries, and on and on it goes. Many of those traditions can be “cleaned up” so subtly no one notices. I thank Nickie for doing the work necessary to produce truly delicious yet health enhancing desserts.

I can see my family is in for some new traditions, and I hope yours is, too. Enjoy!

- Marjorie H. Jones, R.N.
Author of The Allergy Self-Help Cookbook

 

I Love Dessert

Desserts are the sweet threads of the warp and weft of our lives. Because they are connected to so many significant events, they are unique among foods. Birthdays, holidays, graduations, anniversaries – all celebrate with dessert. Even ordinary occasions become special accompanied by sweet treats. Without desserts, we miss more than food; we miss being a part of special events. If you are on a special diet, you don’t have to be deprived. With this book, you too can enjoy delicious fun.

I only eat dessert occasionally, but dessert still is a significant part of my life and my history. My childhood memories are laced with desserts (in spite of coming from a nutrition-aware limited-sugar family). When my grandmother babysat us, we almost always made chocolate chip cookies together. I often came home from school to the spicy aroma of applesauce cooking on the stove or a tantalizing something sweet baking in the oven. My sister and I each got a beater to lick when my mother made a dessert that required a mixer. I even remember many times sitting in front of the window in the oven door watching cakes magically rising as they baked.

Desserts connect friends as well as families. In my early teens we went on a mountain picnic with friends. There we found some wild chokecherry bushes and picked every ripe berry we could find. At home we made them into chokecherry jam with our mothers. This jam found its way into coffee cakes and sandwiches and repeatedly reminded us of our delightful day in the mountains. Because desserts are a special part of friendships, I always enjoy making a homemade treat to share when I visit a friend. Everyone has Christmas memories of cookies connecting friends who participate in cookie exchange parties.

Desserts bind me to many friends who are important contributors to this book. My tasters tell me if the spices in the pfeffernuse are really like what they had growing up in a German community and if something is too sweet, not sweet enough, too hard, too soft, or too crumbly. Of course, each person has different standards for what makes a good dessert, and these vary with how limited their diets are and what grains they are used to eating. A wide variety of input from their different perspectives is invaluable for this book because its readers have diverse dietary needs. Thus, this book provides a broad range of desserts to hopefully make it possible for anyone on almost any diet to find a recipe for making an important occasion more special.

Although we may cook dinner because we have to, we cook dessert because we want to. It is a special way of expressing love, of nurturing ourselves and others who will eat the dessert. Creative activities like making dessert are good for the mind, the emotions, and the soul. The anticipation and planning that goes into making dessert for a special occasion is part of the fun.

Dessert is one of the simple pleasures of life which have sustained people during difficult times. I hope that as many of us face challenges, we will take advantage of opportunities to enjoy desserts, made with family members or friends if possible, and use them as a way to build relationships and enrich our lives.

 

Simple Pleasures, Special Bonds

In good times and bad, having fun helps us maintain our sanity and have a positive outlook. At the time of this writing the world is experiencing a recession. Perhaps this should be a call for us to return to simpler ways of enjoying life. Rather than taking an expensive vacation or buying a new “toy” for enjoyment, consider having some inexpensive fun with family and friends. Dessert can be a part of simple fun and building significant bonds and special memories with other people.

My parents grew up during the Great Depression. Their families had very little money but they considered themselves among the fortunate because they usually had enough food. Because food was almost all they had, they used it for having fun as well as for physical nourishment. My mother told stories about making homemade ice cream with her parents and siblings during summers in the 1930s. Grandpa would fill the ice cream maker with ice and rock salt, Grandma would mix cream, sugar, and vanilla, and all of the kids would take turns cranking. Everybody had a lot of fun, nobody did so much of the work that his arm got sore, and the ice cream was delicious.

My parents began dating during high school and planned to marry after my father finished college. Unfortunately, life became grim when World War II began. My father was anxious about getting good grades so he could keep his educational deferment. When all deferments were suspended, he enlisted in the Navy and my parents decided to marry immediately so my mother could accompany him for his Naval training. The boarding house where they lived in San Francisco for a few months before his ship left had a peach tree in the back yard. They picked peaches and made a cobbler together. As my father kept peeling peaches and encouraging my mother to put just another peach or two into the cobbler, it became so large that it ran all over the oven. They always said it was delicious, however, and this experience became one of their most cherished memories. Whenever we had fresh peaches when I was a child, my mother would say to my father, “Remember the peach cobbler?” Then they would reminisce about how that was the best cobbler they had ever eaten. If my father had been killed, my mother would at least have had her memories of the peach cobbler and their early days together to sustain her for the rest of her life. Dessert helped them cope and enjoy life in spite of the fact that they were living under a dire threat.

When I was a child in the 1950s, the family who lived two houses west of us had a cherry tree in their yard. Every summer when the tart cherries ripened, both mothers, three daughters, and occasionally one son sat under that tree and pitted cherries (using hairpins) for hours on end. Sometimes the older lady who lived one house farther west also joined us. We enjoyed talking to each other while we worked, and each family took a share of the pitted cherries home to make pies, cobblers, and preserves.

During my high school years I remember sitting at the kitchen sink for hours with my mother and peeling apples from the tree in our yard for pies and applesauce. In my late teens my grandmother taught me to make Italian sweet bread, rich with eggs and anise. These experiences all stand out as high points among my memories.

When I had children, the tradition of having fun together with food continued. My two sons helped me in the kitchen from very early ages. I have pictures of each of them at about age 1½ standing on a chair helping wash fruits and vegetables in the kitchen sink. In one of these pictures, asparagus stalks are flying through the air to the other side of the double sink! Such fun! They were kneading bread by age two. Our photo album shows them at age three adding decorations to Christmas cookies. They baked cookies with my mother when she babysat them during their elementary school years. This last Christmas, my older son’s school break from graduate school began several days after my younger son returned home from college. We waited until everyone was home to make our Christmas cookies because they enjoy baking cookies together and carrying on a tradition that spans the generations and binds together our family – past, present, and future.

Desserts create and enhance bonds with friends as well as family. Several members of my dentist’s staff have food allergies, and as I have “unloaded” extra desserts on them while working on recipes for this book, we have developed friendships. I actually look forward to going to the dentist now (especially if all I need is a cleaning).

Sometimes we want to say “Thank you” or “You are special to me” in a tangible way. Giving a homemade dessert is an ideal way to do this. If we buy a small gift, the other person may feel obligated to reciprocate, which can be financially burdensome. However, home-baked goodies say “I value you enough to spend time making something that will bring you pleasure” with no strings attached. When a friend or family member is down, a dessert made with love brings comfort.

A special diet does not have to bring an end to desserts for you. My hope is that this book will bring simple pleasures into your life and help you to create bonds with others and to build special memories that will cheer you for the rest of your life.

 

Desserts Designed for Special Diets

When you are told that you must follow a special diet, you may feel that your days of enjoying what you eat have come to an end. I felt this way just considering the possibility of being on a food allergy diet as I spent two consecutive days having food allergy testing many years ago. The nurse did not tell me what the test results were until all of the testing was completed. I knew I was reacting to many foods, but I didn’t know what they were as I left the doctor’s office the first day. Because I feared that I would never do this again, I stopped at Baskin Robbins on the way home and had a scoop of my favorite ice cream.

After I had been on my food allergy diet for a few weeks, feeling better convinced me that it was very much worth the discipline of staying on the diet faithfully. However, there were occasions where I felt that I was missing out when those around me ate a favorite food. I began experimenting with alternative ingredients to make something similar to the foods I missed and discovered that it is possible to stay on a special diet and do what needs to be done for optimal health without being deprived.

This book contains a wide variety of desserts designed to fit a wide variety of special diets. For example, if you are gluten-intolerant, you will find many desserts that you can use, but they are different in design than the recipes in most gluten-free cookbooks. The recipes in this book do not contain a myriad of allergenic additives, sugar, shortening, and the like so they can also be used by those who are lactose intolerant or avoid milk due to allergy. There are also recipes for those are allergic to eggs or avoid them because of cholesterol, those who avoid sugar because of diabetes or Candida problems, or those who limit the fats they consume, especially saturated or unnatural trans fats. If you have multiple health problems necessitating more than one type of dietary restriction, you will probably find recipes that you can use in this book.

If your restrictions are moderate, there are recipes just for you. Those who are allergic to wheat but not gluten-intolerant can make desserts with a variety of grains using these recipes. If you tolerate spelt, there is a chapter of recipes “especially for guests” that are so normal in taste and texture no one will know they do not contain wheat or sugar. Most of the recipes in this book are free of dairy products and eggs, but if you can tolerate them, some of the recipes in the “Especially for Guests” chapter and a few in other chapters are enhanced by these ingredients. None of the recipes in this book calls for soy, corn, hydrogenated fats, or other common allergens that are in almost all prepared foods but that we can easily cook without; nor do any recipes contain wheat or sugar.

If you cannot have grains at all, you can still have dessert. The all-fruit, ice cream, sherbet, sorbet, and pudding recipes in this book are grain and gluten-free. There are recipes for baked goods made with non-grains such as amaranth, quinoa, and buckwheat; cobblers with nut-coconut toppings; and even waffles made with only a starch (such as tapioca), nuts or seeds and water and which are delicious topped with fresh fruit, ice cream (non-dairy if needed), sorbet and/or a dessert sauce. Almost everyone can find something they can eat in this book. Although your diet may not allow you to eat dessert often, especially if it is a diet for diabetes or Candida, you probably will not have to be deprived on your birthday. However, be sure to ask your doctor about the specifics of your diet, what you must avoid absolutely, and what you can eat occasionally or routinely. Have him or her consider stevia-sweetened desserts if your options are quite limited.

Some of the special ingredients used in this book may be different from any you may have cooked with before even if you are an experienced gluten-free or special diet cook. They are all healthy natural foods, however, and include vitamin C powder for leavening, non-hydrogenated shortening for a few recipes that require a solid fat, and alternative sweeteners such as fruit sweeteners, agave (from a plant in the cactus family) and the herb stevia which is used in a few recipes for those who can have no caloric sweeteners. See the “Know Your Ingredients” chapter, pages 19 to 33, for more about the ingredients used in this book.

Because those of us on special diets may be cooking most or all of our food from scratch, we might feel that we are already spending plenty of time in the kitchen. Therefore the dessert recipes in this book are simpler to make than those in most cookbooks. The ingredient lists are shorter which saves time on measuring. Most of these recipes are just stirred with a spoon. No need to drag out a heavy mixer and then wash its large bowl by hand! If you are not creaming butter with sugar and eggs, there is no need for a mixer. (However, a very few of the recipes in this book do require a mixer). Other equipment you may already have in your kitchen can also save you time. See the next chapter for more about using kitchen tools and other tricks to make desserts easily and quickly.

To see a complete list of the recipes in this book, click here.

 

Recommended by Experts:

Over nearly three decades of working with food sensitive patients, the most common complaints I hear have been about missing the joy and pleasure of a favorite dessert due to sensitivity to one or more ingredients. I Love Dessert is the answer for those struggling with special diets due to allergies or gluten intolerance. Nowhere else can one find such a complete, easy to use, comprehensive guide to the preparation and enjoyment of dessert for those restricted by food intolerance. This book has successfully integrated alternative ingredients into recipes to meet the needs of individuals intolerant of specific foods.

- Nicholas G. Nonas, MD
Allergy, Asthma and Environmental Medicine
Centennial, Colorado

Many family traditions and memories revolve around food – birthday cakes, wedding cakes, Thanksgiving feasts, Christmas and Easter dinners, anniversaries, and on and on it goes. Many of those traditions can be “cleaned up” so subtly no one notices. I thank Nickie for doing the work necessary to produce truly delicious yet health enhancing desserts. I can see my family is in for some new traditions, and I hope yours is, too. Enjoy!

- Marjorie Hurt Jones, RN
Author of The Allergy Self-Help Cookbook

With I Love Dessert, you will discover new ingredients like agave to safely sweeten your life. Using the information in this book, you will be able to successfully and easily prepare a wide variety of treats that are allowed on your special diet. Enjoy these delicious and nutritious desserts!

- Ann Fisk, RN
Founder of An Ounce of Prevention

 

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The information contained in this website is merely intended to communicate material which is helpful and educational to the reader. It is not intended to replace medical diagnosis or treatment, but rather to provide information and recipes which may be helpful in implementing a diet and program prescribed by your doctor. Please consult your physician for medical advice before changing your diet.

There are no warranties which extend beyond the educational nature of this website. Therefore, we shall have neither liability nor responsibility to any person with respect to any loss or damage alleged to be caused, directly or indirectly, by the information contained in this website.

Copyright 2011 by Allergy Adapt, Inc. The books from which this website was excerpted copyrighted in 2003, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011.